Heritage and modernity

The casemates of Luxembourg were dug out by the various invading forces. They served as communication galleries and as shelters for soldiers, horses and artillery. The 17 kilometre long network of galleries and underground passages isone of the most visited attractions of the capital.

Christof Weber / SIP
What is so typical about the Luxembourg architectural challenge is merging the ancient and the modern. The capital’s more than one-thousand-year-old fortifications are neighboured by modern buildings. Classic and modern architectural styles are in perfect unison.

Marc Theis / SIP
The Banque et caisse d’épargne de l’État’s tower, on the Place de Metz, represents the emblem of the bank and is one of the symbols of Luxembourg City.

Christof Weber / SIP
Belval train station. Picture taken on the 28th September 2010 during the inaugural ceremony.

Claude Piscitelli
The famous Bock cliff, with the Central Bank of Luxembourg in the background. Count Sigefried acquired the rock in 963 and built a fort around which a fortress-city gradually expanded.

Christof Weber / SIP
The Bourglinster château, in the centre of Luxembourg, is home to exhibitions, concerts, conferences and banquets.

SIP
Bourscheid castle towers high above the Sûre valley. The fortress dates back to the 11th century and is one of the major attractions of the Oesling region.

Marcel Schmitz / SIP
The Breedewee (Broadway) is part of the historical area of Luxembourg City founded in 963 by count Sigfried.

Christof Weber / SIP
In the historical center of Luxembourg City, one thousand years of fortifications and medieval houses border the twisting alleys.

SIP
Clervaux is home to an abbey, which can be seen in the background left, and an imposing castle hosting the famous photo exhibition The Family of Man by Edward Steichen, an American photographer born in Luxembourg.

Christof Weber / SIP
A 65-metre high dungeon towers over the grand-ducal château in Colmar-Berg.

Éitions Guy Binsfeld
D’Coque is located in Luxembourg-Kirchberg and is a work of the French architect Roger Taillibert. Called “Coque” because of its shell-like shape, the center boasts numerous gyms, six swimming pools and 10,000 seats.

Christof Weber / SIP
Winter view from the “Plateau du Rahm” above the old “Grund” quarter. In the foreground, a Spanish watchtower reminds of the ancient Luxembourg fortress.

Christof Weber / SIP
View on the “Dënzelt”, former law court of the 14th century on the “Place du Marché” in Echternach.

Christof Weber / SIP
Echternach, tourist spot par excellence, located in the eastern part of the country, is home to the remains of a Roman villa which is among the largest in central Europe.

Christof Weber / SIP
The Luxembourg fortress, altered and fortified several times, used to be one of the most important in Europe. Considered untakable the capital became known as the “Gibraltar of the North”.

Christof Weber / SIP
Built in 1907, the central station of Luxembourg was classified as “Historic Monument” since 1989. The area around the station and the buildings echoing the historicist, modern and art deco style, offer a prime example of the architecture in the late 19th and in the early 2t0h centuries.

Christof Weber / SIP
Once an artisan district, the suburb “Grund” in the lower city is nowadays drawing restaurants, cafes, artist studios and cultural facilities together, ccreating a friendly, artistic atmosphere.

SIP
The bronze statue standing amid the Place Guillaume II was erected in honour of the King Grand Duke Guillaume II of Orange-Nassau who reigned between 1840 and 1849.

Christof Weber / SIP
The blast furnaces in Esch-Belval

Claude Piscitelli
The gourmet islet in the heart of the old city is situated behind the facade of the 14th, 15th and 17th century buildings. Today, restaurants and bistros scatter the islet.

Christof Weber / SIP
The Kirchberg plateau is home to numerous banks and European institutions. The buildings' designs are that of a contemporary city.

Christof Weber / SIP
Old working-class houses in the steel region in Luxembourg’s mining basin.

Christof Weber / SIP
The Marché-aux-Herbes is a sqaure bordered by an urban and architectural ensemble of ancient bourgeois houses with facades mostly dating back to the 18th and 19th centuries.

SIP
The Marché-aux-Poissons square is an urban and architectural ensemble. On the right is the National Museum of History and Art Luxembourg. The Marché-aux-Herbes, with its buildings dating back to the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, is one of the oldest districts of the capital.

Christof Weber / SIP
Munsbach castle dates back to the 19th century and is situated in the small village of Munsbach in the east of the country.

Christof Weber / SIP
First an abbey, then a military hospital, a prison and then a transit camp in the time of the nazi regime, the “Ancient Neumünster Abbey” was eventually turned into a cultural exchange center. Situated at the foot of a cliff hosting the casemates of the ancient Luxembourg fortress, the place is open to knowledge sharing and cultural dialogues. Theatres, conference and meeting rooms, open air cultural events and artist workshops enhance the culture-friendly atmosphere reigning at the Ancient Neumünster Abbey.

Christof Weber / SIP
Located in the lower city of the Grund, the Ancient Neumünster Abbey now is the Cultural Exchange Center Abbey Neumünster. A former prison, the place is today a place of cultural dialogue and sharing.

SIP
The Philharmonie - or Concert Hall Grande-Duchesse Joséphine-Charlotte - is the work of the French architect Christian de Portzamparc. With its daring round shapes, the Philharmonie embodies a great stimulating asset to the Luxembourg and Greater Region’s music life.

Christof Weber / SIP
823 columns surround the Philharmonie designed by French architect Christian de Portzamparc. It is home to three complementary concert halls: the great Auditorium, the chamber music hall and the open-air space.

SIP
In Luxembourg City, the Rotondes are former bus and locomotive repair workshops of the Luxembourg railroads. In 2007, when Luxembourg and the Greater Region were European Capital of Culture, the Rotondes attracted many visitors.

Christian Aschmann
The only remaining part of the ancient Berwart castle, the tower was integrated into the new ARBED building in Esch-sur-Alzette. The ARBED also hosts the Technoport Schlassgoart, business incubator managed by the Public Research Center Henri Tudor.

Christof Weber / SIP
The SKIP is the information pavilion of the Science City and future National Center of the Industrial Culture, surrounding the last two furnaces in West-Belval.

Christof Weber / SIP
Fort Thüngen, built in 1723, is a fort belonging to the ancient Luxembourg fortress. Today, it hosts the Museum of the Fortress of Luxembourg. In the background: the Museum of Modern Art Grand Duke Jean (MUDAM).

Christof Weber / SIP
Hundred-year-old fortifications harmoniously neighbour modern buildings in Luxembourg, like the Vauban tower and the Grande-Duchesse Charlotte bridge, most commonly called the “Red Bridge”.

Christof Weber / SIP
Useldange castle dates back to the 11th century and boasts a cultural footpath with more than 20 stations. The trail is adapted for blind or partially sighted visitors, as some resorts enable them to smell, hear and feel the wealth of the past.

Christof Weber / SIP
Vianden boasts a perfectly restored castle, built between the 11th and 14th centuries. Nowadays it is a major tourist attraction.

Les Amis du château de Vianden
With more than 200,000 visitors per year, the Vianden castle in the Luxembourg Ardennes is the most visited monument in the Grand Duchy.

Christof Weber / SIP
The Pithead Baths in Ellergronn is part of the ancient mines in Ellergronn, located south of Esch-sur-Alzette. It is a witness of the industrial heritage in the south of Luxembourg.

Christof Weber / SIP
  • Updated 05-05-2015